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Sorcerer Multiclassing Guide: D&D 5e Innate Concepts

D&D 5e Sorcerer multiclassing image by Wizard of the Coast’s Strixhaven: Curriculum of Chaos.
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Welcome to Flutes’ exhaustive guide for Sorcerer multiclassing character builds. Multiclassing is daunting for new players, but rewarding for experienced players. Many classes benefit more from multiclassing than from investing twenty levels in a single class. Aside from optimization, multiclassing allows you to bring unique characters to life with outside-the-box specialties. Multiclassing can be useful for roleplaying as well, so it’s not merely for min-max-style players.

Some Sorcerer multiclass concepts involve Sorcerer as the primary class with the majority of the levels. Other concepts will include the Sorcerer as a secondary class with minimal level investment. The secondary class may be referred to as a “dip” into that class if the concept only needs 1-3 levels in the second class. Being a secondary class does not mean a character won’t start at level one as that class; some classes get more armor and hitpoints at level one.


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General Notes on Sorcerer Multiclassing

Don’t forget that multiclassing requires minimum ability scores in both new and prior classes (as described on page 163 of the PHB, or page 54 of Eberron RftLW for Artificers). For example, if you are a Cleric multiclassing as a Rogue, you’ll need a Wisdom score of 13 or higher, and a Dexterity score of 13 or higher.

Class Ability Score Minimums:

  • Artificer – Intelligence 13
  • Barbarian – Strength 13
  • Bard – Charisma 13
  • Cleric – Wisdom 13
  • Druid – Wisdom 13
  • Fighter – Strength 13 or Dexterity 13
  • Monk – Dexterity 13 and Wisdom 13
  • Paladin – Strength 13 and Charisma 13
  • Ranger – Dexterity 13 and Wisdom 13
  • Rogue – Dexterity 13
  • Sorcerer – Charisma 13
  • Warlock – Charisma 13
  • Wizard – Intelligence 13

Dipping 1-2 Levels to/from Sorcerer

As mentioned earlier, dipping one or two levels can be enough to justify multiclassing. Let’s review which combinations get enough value from dipping and don’t require extensive multiclassing.

Which classes have the best reasons to dip into Sorcerer?

The Sorcerer is one of the best bang-for-your-buck multiclass options because it gets a subclass at level one. The Divine Soul Sorcerer is a popular one-level dip because of its spellcasting and its Favored by the Gods feature to fortify saving throws in a pinch. The Shadow Magic Sorcerer gains 120-foot darkvision and a survivability feature at level one. Most of the Xanathar’s and Tasha’s Sorcerer subclasses have valuable features at level one, but don’t ignore the value of spellcasting (even first-level spells).

In other words, any character looking to buff their saving throws while picking up spellcasting can pick up one level of Divine Soul Sorcerer. Characters who already have spellcasting can still do this because the Sorcerer spell list can lend some new spell options to classes like the Druid. This might seem like a minor way to multiclass with Sorcerer, but it’s actually one of the most common multiclass choices of staunch optimizers. Divine Soul also provides useful Cleric spell options like Bless and Healing Word.

Similar to the Divine Soul subclass, the Wild Magic Sorcerous Origin can similarly be used to help a character with saving throws. It has the Tides of Chaos feature to get advantage on a save. You can potentially use it more than once per long rest if you’re activating Wild Magic Surge.

Which classes do Sorcerers want for multiclass dips?

Sorcerers benefit from any class that improves the character’s armor proficiencies. You can start at level one as a class that gets armor proficiencies, or you can multiclass with a class that gets armor when multiclassing. There are also several subclasses that specifically get medium or heavy armor. Cleric subclasses often gain heavy armor as a subclass feature, including the Twilight Domain.

Classes that already overlap with the Charisma focus will be premium. Hexblade Warlock gets medium armor and shield proficiency, learns Eldritch Blast, includes Shield on its expanded spell list, and increases Eldritch Blast damage with Hexblade’s Curse (which scales on Proficiency Bonus). Sorcerers that are highly optimized will commonly take Paladin levels along with the Hexblade Warlock to have melee options and other interesting options. However, Paladin auras are the real prize for Sorcerers. Sorcerers have full-spellcaster spell slot progression, allowing them to make great use of several Warlock and Paladin features. An example is upcasting Armor of Agathys from the Warlock spell list.

Sorcerers and Warlocks

If Hexblade’s Curse isn’t tempting, characters may consider the Fiend Warlock for its ability to gain temporary hitpoints after it kills creatures. This is more helpful for hordes than the Hexblade’s Curse.

The Fathomless Warlock at level one is a rare way to gain a swimming speed and water breathing. It’s also forty swimming speed instead of the usual thirty.

Genie Warlocks gain Bottled Respite in their Genie’s Vessel for ease of short resting. Genie’s Wrath is also a nice passive buff to damage with attacks, and it scales by Proficiency Bonus.

Taking levels of Warlock enables a “coffee-lock” build that is a common multiclass concept; it involves using Pact Magic from the Warlock to recharge Sorcery Points. Pact Magic slots recharge on short rests, so it’s a quick way to regain Sorcery Points.

Invocations roll in at level two for Warlocks, so some characters will go for two levels of Warlock instead of one. Invocations can transform the game for certain characters, but many of them have prerequisites that involve three or more levels of Warlock. The most common Invocation for a Warlock multiclass dip is Agonizing Blast for its damage boost to Eldritch Blast, but there may be other Invocations that are more fitting to a character concept. Devil’s Sight is another common Invocation for working in magical darkness. Mask of Many Faces is popular for trickster characters. Eldritch Mind is a new Invocation from Tasha’s that helps with Constitution saving throws to maintain concentration.

Do not ignore this detail: when you have Eldritch Blast and the Agonizing Blast Invocation, you can cast Eldritch Blast twice per turn using your Quickened Spell Metamagic. This allows you to deal a lot of damage for a mere Sorcery Point while saving your spell slots.

Three levels of Warlock and selecting Pact of the Tome will meet the prerequisite for the Aspect of the Moon Invocation. With DM permission, this Invocation enables a spellcaster to create spell scrolls during long rests since they don’t need to sleep.


How to Roleplay When Your Sorcerer Multiclasses

Not all level-twenty abilities are worth getting; for example, Rangers have a poor level-twenty class feature, so they gain more from multiclassing. Other classes like Druid and Paladin have excellent level-twenty abilities. I typically shy away from recommending multiclass if they’re a character’s core class. The exception would be if I have a fun concept or I want to focus on lower levels of play; after all, most campaigns end by level ten. Several of my recommendations are thematically cool or unusually unique to D&D.

Most players don’t foreshadow or roleplay their core class features anyway, so why should it be so difficult to justify what you gain from multiclassing? Just because you’re not sticking with a single class doesn’t mean you should feel more excessively burdened than other characters to narrate your character’s progress. You could treat the multiclassing as a mere mechanical change. You don’t have to suddenly tell people that you’re two classes. Pretend your core class has something different about it that is justified by multiclassing.


Multiclass Recommendations by Subclass

I’ll now go through each Sorcerer subclass to list ideas for multiclassing. Some of them will be for fun and others will be for optimal character builds.

Aberrant Mind Sorcerer Subclass (TCoE)

Bonus cantrips: Mind Sliver
Bonus spells:

  1. Mind Sliver, Arms of Hadar, Dissonant Whispers
  2. Detect Thoughts, Calm Emotions
  3. Hunger of Hadar, Sending
  4. Evard’s Black Tentacles, Summon Aberration
  5. Telekinesis, Rary’s Telepathic Bond

Summary of subclass features: Psionic Spells expanded spells (see above) that can be swapped for divination and enchantment spells. Telepathy with creatures one-on-one. Casting Psionic Spells with Sorcery Points instead of spell slots and without verbal or somatic components. Alter your body with a transformation where you choose one trait per Sorcery Point spent, and the options include swimming/underwater breathing, flying, sliming, and seeing invisibility. Teleport while dealing damage to those you leave behind while moving them toward your previous location.

Notes: This subclass is strong because of its expanded spell list alone. Beyond that, its features are strong and useful, making this Aberrant Mind Sorcerer subclass very strong.

Aberrant Mind Sorcerer Multiclass Recommendations

Aberrant Mind Sorcerer (18) / Great Old One Warlock (2)

If you don’t want to do the usual Hexblade dip, you might go with the Great Old One. You could freely communicate telepathically with nearby creatures with GOO’s telepathy, and create a long-distance communication link with a chosen creature with AM’s telepathy. You can select different Invocations than the usual Agonzing Blast for Eldritch Blast, but it’s a significant sacrifice.

Aberrant Mind Sorcerer (18) / Hexblade Warlock (2)

This combination provides much more value than the Great Old One suggest above. Sorcerers get a lot from two levels of Hexblade, as I mentioned earlier: armor, shields, amplified Eldritch Blast damage, plus subclass perks.

You can treat this as a concept where your aberrant psionics have caused you to resonate with a weapon that has developed a relationship with you, perhaps harmlessly feeding off your brainwaves.

Aberrant Mind Sorcerer (17) / Whispers Bard (3)

I love the idea of a character who sets up a telepathic link while using that brain whisper to use Words of Terror (Bard). You become that person who melds into a crowd while completely messing with someone. Your DM needs to allow you to trigger some of your “spoken” abilities through telepathy.

Aberrant Mind Sorcerer (13) / Devotion Paladin (7)

Your mind is guarded against mental attacks since your aura prevents charms. Your attacks can be amplified as you focus on functioning as a sword and sorcery character. Perhaps your higher mind is a result of your devotion or vice versa. This is a divine take on the reason for the Aberrant Mind’s psionic powers. You’re like an angel looking into the minds of your enemies and the heretics to see their sins! Is this Ghost Rider?


Clockwork Soul Sorcerer Subclass (TCoE)

Bonus spells:

  1. Alarm, Protection from Evil and Good
  2. Aid, Lesser Restoration
  3. Dispel Magic, Protection from Energy
  4. Freedom of Movement, Summon Construct
  5. Greater Restoration, Wall of Force

Summary of subclass features: Clockwork Spells expanded spells (see above) that can be swapped for abjuration and transmutation spells. Cancel advantage and disadvantage as a reaction. Create a protective ward for yourself or an ally by expending Sorcery Points. Enter a one-minute trance as a bonus action so enemies can’t gain advantage to attack you, and you treat nines or lower as tens when you roll attacks, saving throws, or ability checks. Restore 100 hitpoints, split among creatures as you choose repair objects, and cleanse spells of sixth level and lower as you choose in the area.

Notes: This subclass is strong because of its expanded spell list alone. Beyond that, its features are also strong and useful, making this Clockwork Soul Sorcerer subclass very strong.

Clockwork Soul Sorcerer Multiclass Recommendations

Clockwork Soul Sorcerer (18) / Hexblade Warlock (2)

This is an optimization build. As I mentioned earlier, Hexblade provides extreme value quickly. Two levels is enough to give you Eldritch Blast empowered by Agonizing Blast (damage) and Repelling Blast (control) Invocations. Hexblade also gets you medium armor and shields to improve your defenses. Since the Clockwork Soul is debatably the strongest Sorcerous Origin, I have to pair it with Hexblade on this list.

Begin at level one as a Sorcerer so you can have proficiency with Constitution saving throws (for concentration). Immediately multiclass two levels of Warlock, then return to Sorcerer the rest of the way. Doing so improves your survivability and damage output for the rest of your adventuring career. You’ll need to identify the best spells to choose, especially for optimally swapping out Clockwork Spells. Here’s a HexClock build for Clockwork Soul Sorcerer and Hexblade Warlock by Tabletop Builds that will help you.

The Clockwork Soul has features that definitely warrant a heavy investment in Sorcerer levels. This multiclass combination certainly does that and excels at protecting the Sorcerer while enabling it to do what players want a Sorcerer to do!

Clockwork Soul Sorcerer (19) / Order Cleric (1)

This is one of the most powerful spellcasting multiclass concepts I’ve ever seen. It rivals the potency of Wizards, and that’s a big statement. The Clockwork Soul Sorcerer is extremely powerful with its abilities and spell list. The Order Cleric’s voice of authority is helpful at all levels of play, meaning your ability to support and empower allies is incredible. You can heal, wear armor, and cast powerful spells with Metamagic boosts.

I credit Treantmonk for pointing out how strong this combination is. You can hear his full build for this combination on his YouTube channel, or browse the level-twenty character sheet on D&D Beyond. I recommend his video because I guarantee you’ll learn a thing or two.

Clockwork Soul Sorcerer (1+) / Chronurgy Wizard (2+) 

These subclasses share a theme of time, order, and convergence. They’re both strong, so you can choose how to level up depending on what sounds fun. I recommend going to at least level fourteen for the one you’re focusing on. You foresee alternate timelines and how they interact with the present. I believe this would be a fun concept for an Aasimar who is roleplaying like an angel interested in solely justice and order. All chaos must be brought in line with the universe’s natural progress as outlined by the gods (or at least that’s how you see it).

Clockwork Soul Sorcerer (18) / Divination Wizard (2)

Fragments of time are laid bare before you, and you bend them to your will. Portent allows you to foresee rolls to use them when the moment is right. The Clockwork Sorcerer’s abilities will allow you to manipulate rolls further when advantage and disadvantage are involved. Choose a character from popular culture to emulate for their precognitive abilities. You’ll be a dice lawyer for your party.

Clockwork Soul Sorcerer (x) / Armorer Artificer (x)

This is a build I heard from D4 Network on YouTube, so check out his video. It’s a tanking spellcaster that sounds fun and unique.


Divine Soul Sorcerer Subclass (XGtE)

Bonus spells: Cleric spells by alignment at level one, and options at level up to select Cleric spells.

Summary of subclass features: Option to add 2d4 to a saving throw or attack roll once per short rest. Spend Sorcery Points to reroll healing dice. Grow wings as a bonus action. Regain half your hitpoints as a bonus action once per long rest.

Notes: This subclass is a common one-level multiclass dip because Favored of the Gods is extremely helpful for fortifying saving throws, and first-level Cleric spells are strong.

Divine Soul Sorcerer Multiclass Recommendations

Divine Soul Sorcerer (19) / Life Cleric (1)

Enliven your Divine Soul Sorcerer with the Life Cleric’s bonus healing for spells. Protect your Sorcerer with heavy armor that would normally be inaccessible. You’ll also avoid wasting Sorcerer spells learned on low-level healing spells like Cure Wounds and Healing Word because you’ll learn them all with your Cleric multiclass dip. This is a simple combo that amplifies what is best about the Divine Soul Sorcerer. 

Divine Soul Sorcerer (11) / Watchers Paladin (7) / Hexblade Warlock (2)

This is an optimization build (if you couldn’t tell from the Hexblade levels). You can read about why this is debatably one of the most effective character builds in the game for a Paladin over at Tabletop Builds. They also have a version of the build where Hexblade is swapped for Undead as the Warlock patron. One of my favorite parts of this character is that it’s a Paladin that can cast Spirit Guardians.

Divine Soul Sorcerer (13) / Devotion Paladin (7)

You are a wrathful angel on the prowl for heretics! You can amplify your weapon attacks while pumping high spell slots into smiting. Go for eight levels of Paladin if you want another ASI instead of 7th-level spells. This character should probably never fail a saving throw if you build it well, but you’re not compelled to focus on that.

Undead Warlock (2) / Fey Wanderer Ranger (16) / Divine Soul Sorcerer (1) / Twilight Cleric (1)

I like this concept as a power build that plays into the fey trickster archetype. You’re slippery and efficient in and out of combat. The Fey Wanderer is a solid subclass to focus on. Rangers don’t get much above fifteenth level, freeing you up for multiclass dips for better features.

I recommend flavoring the Undead Warlock as if it’s a manifestation of your history as a pickled fey creature. You can also pretend it’s the Archfey Warlock Patron, but with a better level-one ability for your purposes. Form of Dread pairs well with your Fey Wanderer features involving fear. I’d describe the temporary hitpoints gained as a phasing effect as attacks phase through you until your temporary hitpoints deplete.

Twilight Cleric gives you a lot in one level, including enhanced darkvision and advantage on Initiative rolls. You can make use of the extra spells and spell slots, too. Twilight is a decent theme for this character, too.

Divine Soul Sorcerer will net you the Favored by the Gods feature to reinforce your saving throws. I’d treat this as a fey feature instead of a godly intervention.


Draconic Bloodline Sorcerer Subclass (PHB)

Summary of subclass features: Scaly armor and another hitpoint per level. Add Charisma to your element’s damage. Gain resistance to your element for a Sorcery Point. Manifest wings as a bonus action. Exude a fear aura for five Sorcery Point for one minute while concentrating on the effect.

Draconic Bloodline Sorcerer Multiclass Recommendations

Draconic Bloodline Sorcerer (17) / Thief Rogue (3)

Use Fash Hands to coat a creature in oil as a bonus action improvised attack (oil (flask) adventuring gear). Hitting the creature will cover it in oil for one minute, and each instance of fire damage dealt to it will be boosted by five (rules on this are vague, so ask your DM about oil duration). Cast Scorching Ray to potentially deal fifteen extra fire damage from the oil if all your rays hit. Elemental Affinity will add your Charisma modifier to the damage once, potentially adding five fire damage.

You can create a potent fire blaster with this combination, and Cunning Action is always great for getting into advantageous positions or avoiding getting surrounded. Use any Sorcerer for this combination, but the Elemental Affinity of the Draconic Sorcerer made it stick out for fire damage.

Draconic Bloodline Sorcerer (18) / Tempest Cleric (2)

This character has embraced the storm in their biology, perhaps sharing a bloodline with a Blue Dragon. The Tempest Cleric can max the damage roll of a lightning or thunder spell. Transmuted Spell is the new Metamagic option from Tasha’s that allows a Sorcerer to change the elemental damage of a spell. Draconic Bloodline Sorcerers love elemental damage, especially maxing it out. Fireball can become lightning ball for you. The Tempest Cleric also gives you heavy armor to be less of a sitting duck.

Celestial Warlock (14) / Draconic Bloodline (6)

This concept was kindly shared by a comment from MadnessOpus: “One combination that I would like to point out is Celestial Warlock 14/Draconic Bloodline 6 (with Gold/Brass/Red Ancestor for fire damage: I REALLY, really hope they will update the list with Fizban’s Gem Dragons so this could work with Crystal and radiant damage somehow?).”

“Thematically, golden dragons are known to be forces of justice and all that’s good, hence my choice of Gold Ancestor Dragon. You have made a pact with one that’s on divine levels. Heck, maybe even Bahamut himself offered you to be one of his devoted vanguard, who then helped you to manifest your just nature through rewarding you with gold dragon blood inheritance, beyond what comes in the package with a standard pact with a Celestial.”

“Gameplay-wise, start as a Sorcerer to get proficiency in CON saves, permanent Mage Armor, and pick Shield and Absorb Elements as your first two spells. One extra HP per Sorcerer level is not bad either for a dip if you start with 16 CON. Switch onto Warlock to get 6 levels for Radiant Soul to make fire and radiant spells hit extra CHA modifier. When choosing your Pact Boon, I highly recommend Tome to grab Shillelagh: basically a Hexblade Light, and technically, you can use the same staff as your arcane focus. Not to mention Green Flame Blade might come in handy minding our affinity for fire damage. Finish with Guidance and Word of Radiance and you’re good to be somehow support-melee-reliable.”

“Also at level 3, pick Book of Ancient Secrets and pick Find Familiar as one of the rituals so you can support your teammates with your celestial owl (sorry WotC, you had it coming when putting Flyby on it). Goes without saying that Elemental Adept: Fire is a no-brainer for your first ASI, although Moderately Armored might come in handy then or later. After getting these 6 levels in Warlock, get 6 levels in Sorcerer to pick up Elemental Affinity, so you can add your CHA modifier to fire spells AGAIN. Yes, they stack, and they do it wonderfully. Then finish the build with the remainder of your Warlock levels and you’re golden (pun totally unintended).”

“Other than that, when it comes to the build, I have to add that this way you can learn some of your run-of-the-mill fire spells (Burning Hands, Scorching Ray, Fireball, Melf’s Minute Meteors etc.) through Sorcerer and cast them using your Warlock spellslots, while at the same time you can focus on healing spells of Celestial Warlock and cast them using your Sorcerer slots should your Healing Light pool go dry. Radiant damage spells can also come in handy, however not as hard-hitting after getting Elemental Adept: Fire. Celestial Warlock is more of a secondary healer taking, well, how restricted Pact Magic is into consideration, after all.

“Oh, and you can also grab Aspect of the Moon invocation if you’re tempted by CoffeeLock shenanigans. However, have in mind that’s on you if your DM looks down on you for that.”


Shadow Magic Sorcerer Subclass (XGtE)

Bonus spells: Darkness (level three)

Summary of subclass features: Gain a special use for the Darkness spell with your Sorcery Points so you can see in the magical darkness. Stay conscious instead of dropping when you reach zero hitpoints if you pass a Charisma saving throw. Summon a shadowy hound. Freely teleport as a bonus action when you’re in dim light or darkness. Spend six Sorcery Points to transform for one minute and gain resistance to all damage except radiant and force, movement through solid objects.

Shadow Sorcerer Multiclass Recommendations

Shadow Sorcerer (12-19) / Trickery Cleric (1-8)

While the Trickery Cleric’s domain features are famously subpar, its domain spells are premium. Polymorph, Mirror Image, Dimension Door, and other domain spells are excellent. A Cleric that can cast Polymorph is always useful. And that’s not all; these domain spells don’t require investment in Wisdom, so the core class can focus on its own spellcasting modifier. 

Polymorph in combat diminishes at higher levels, but it still makes a good spell for saving characters that are in danger. The Sorcerer’s Metamagic feature will enable you to twincast spells like Polymorph on several of your allies at once. Both classes are full spellcasters, so you won’t sacrifice spell slot progression. You just won’t have spells of 8th or 9th level. 

Even though the Trickery Cleric doesn’t have heavy armor proficiency, it’ll still get medium armor and shield proficiencies so the character can armor up. I gave the level ranges in my recommendation because there is a multitude of pros and cons to weight based on what’s fun for you. Get Cleric to level 8 if you want the ASI, Divine Domain feature, and Destroy Undead increase to CR 1. 

Otherwise, only go as far as sounds fun because otherwise, you’ll miss out on high-level sorcery and a greater supply of Sorcery Points. Don’t skip out on a Death Ward spell to pad your survivability with Strength of the Grave.

Shadow Magic Sorcerer (3) / Shadow Monk (17)

Embrace the shadow as a martial artist using darkness. Your natural gifts of the Shadowfell lend well to your training.

Spells can help a Monk have additional fun in and out of combat, but the main selling point here is at level one as a Shadow Magic Sorcerer. Gaining darkvision and an option to resemble Devil’s Sight is excellent. This deals with common criticisms of the Shadow Monk since it can’t see in its own magical darkvision and it lacks darkvision. The Shadow Monk also gets Pass without Trace to set up your party for an ambush attack; who doesn’t love a free round in combat!?


Storm Sorcerer Subclass (XGtE)

Bonus proficiencies: Speak Primordial (including the specific elemental languages)

Summary of subclass features: Fly ten feet away when casting a leveled spell without provoking opportunity attacks. Resistance to lightning and thunder damage (immunity at high levels). Casting a leveled thunder or lightning spell allows you to also damage a nearby enemy equal to half your Sorcerer level. Manipulate the wind and rain in the immediate vicinity in minor ways. React to melee attacks against you with damage and potential pushback. Gain a flying speed that you can reduce to give your allies a flying speed with you.

Storm Sorcerer Multiclass Recommendations

Storm Sorcerer (18) / Tempest Cleric (2)

This is mostly to follow the theme if you’re playing a Storm Sorcerer. This combination, on its own, will not get the same results as other possible combinations. The Storm Sorcerer is not on par with the other Sorcerous Origins from XGtE, but it’s an adequate subclass that follows the storm theme along with the Tempest Cleric. The Channel Divinity: Destructive Wrath (not to be confused with the spell Destructive Wave) allows the character to deal maximum damage with a lightning or thunder spell when it matters most. Heavy armor will also help the character’s survivability.

D&D Optimized made a cool build with this concept using Chromatic Orb and crit fishing with Elven Accuracy. It’s not the same as this basic concept I have here, so I recommend his video if you’re interested (follow the link).

Thanks to Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything, Sorcerers gain the Transmuted Spell option for Metamagic. This enables the Tempest Cleric’s Channel Divinity to apply to spells like Fireball when transformed to deal lightning damage.


Wild Magic Sorcerer Subclass (PHB)

Summary of subclass features: Gain Wild Magic Surge to roll on the Wild Magic Table based on DM allowing it to trigger. Gain advantage on a saving throw once, or recharge the ability with Wild Magic Surge. Use your reaction to spend two Sorcery Points to add or subtract 1d4 from an attack, saving throw, or ability check for another creature you can see. Later, your Wild Magic Surge is rolled twice per instance and you choose which one to use. When you roll max damage on a spell’s damage die, you can keep that roll and roll it again; you can do that once per spell for one die and only once per turn.

Wild Magic Sorcerer Multiclass Recommendations

Wild Magic Sorcerer (18) / Hexblade Warlock (2)

The ancient weapon that you’ve made a pact with has an inherent jinx to it. You can play your random-riddled Wild Magic Sorcerer while still dealing damage that contributes to your party before you accidentally blow them up. As mentioned earlier, these two levels of Hexblade get you Eldritch Blast and the Agonizing Blast Invocation. You will also gain medium armor and shield proficiencies. Start as a Sorcerer at level one for Constitution saving throw proficiency, then immediately grab two Warlock levels.

Wild Magic Sorcerer (11) / Hexblade Warlock (2) / Watchers Paladin (7)

This would be considered a power build. This character might be a source of a magical flux that has caused them distress, prompting them to make an Oath of a Watcher. Wild arcane energy is channeled through a magical weapon to be wielded against aberrations from other worlds. You can select any Warlock or Paladin you like, but these are common choices.

Wild Magic Sorcerer (6) / Wild Magic Barbarian (14)

Some players absolutely love wild magic, so let’s crash the two unpredictable subclasses together. Conveniently, the desirable subclass features line up with this division of levels. Your abilities will twist fate in your favor while adding random effects for your spellcasting. Raging obviously doesn’t mix with spellcasting in battle, so you’ll be deciding which to use when you fight. Spellcasting will be helpful in all aspects of play.

Wild Magic Sorcerer (10) / Wild Magic Barbarian (3) / Ancients Paladin (7)

Your wild magical energies give you resistance to damage from spells like an arcane barrier. Maybe your skin has moth-like dust that douses magic. Divine Smite will be fun with your Sorcerer spell slots.


Conclusion

Sorcerers are one of the power-build classes since they get subclasses at level one. The sooner a class gets a subclass, the more tempting it is for multiclass builds. Sorcerers are also Charisma-based, and that creates ease of multiclassing with some of the other commonly multiclassed builds, especially Warlocks.

You can find more content on multiclassing in our other articles, particularly our class-level multiclassing combinations article.

21 thoughts on “<b>Sorcerer Multiclassing Guide</b>: D&D 5e Innate Concepts”

  1. One combination that I would like to point out is Celestial Warlock 14/Draconic Bloodline 6 (with Gold/Brass/Red Ancestor for fire damage: I REALLY, really hope they will update the list with Fizban’s Gem Dragons so this could work with Crystal and radiant damage somehow?).

    Thematically, golden dragons are known to be forces of justice and all that’s good, hence my choice of Gold Ancestor Dragon. You have made a pact with one that’s on divine levels. Heck, maybe even Bahamut himself offered you to be one of his devoted vanguard, who then helped you to manifest your just nature through rewarding you with gold dragon blood inheritance, beyond what comes in package with standard pact with a Celestial.

    Gameplay-wise, start as a Sorcerer to get proficiency in CON saves, permanent Mage Armor, and pick Shield and Absorb Elements as your first two spells. One extra HP per Sorcerer level is not bad either for a dip if you start with 16 CON. Switch onto Warlock to get 6 levels for Radiant Soul to make fire and radiant spells hit extra CHA modifier. When choosing your Pact Boon, I highly recommend Tome to grab Shillelagh: basically a Hexblade Light, and technically, you can use the same staff as your arcane focus. Not to mention Green Flame Blade might come in handy minding our affinity for fire damage. Finish with Guidance and Word of Radiance and you’re good to be somehow support-melee-reliable. Also at level 3, pick Book of Ancient Secrets and pick Find Familiar as one of the rituals so you can support your teammates with your celestial owl (sorry WotC, you had it coming when putting Flyby on it). Goes without saying that Elemental Adept: Fire is a no-brainer for your first ASI, although Moderately Armored might come in handy then or later. After getting these 6 levels in Warlock, get 6 levels in Sorcerer to pick up Elemental Affinity, so you can add your CHA modifier to fire spells AGAIN. Yes, they stack, and they do it wonderfully. Then finish the build with remainder of your Warlock levels and you’re golden (pun totally unintended).

    That being said, you’ve mentioned 20th level abilities that are not as hot as the others… Bard Multiclassing Guide next?

    1. That’s a fantastic idea, MadnessOpus! I’ve added your description to the article and credited you for the idea. I had not considered these two subclasses, but I like what you’ve outlined.
      As for Bards, yes, I had the Bard multiclassing article drafted. I hope to publish it when it’s ready within a month or two. 🙂

      1. Thanks a lot. I wrote this kind of haphazardly, but I hope I could convey the main idea of the build. It might need an edit once more, since from what I see, you must have added the first paragraph from previous combo by mistake.

        Other than that, when it comes to the build, I have to add that this way you can learn some of your run-of-the-mill fire spells (Burning Hands, Scorching Ray, Fireball, Melf’s Minute Meteors etc.) through Sorcerer and cast them using your Warlock spellslots, while at the same time you can focus on healing spells of Celestial Warlock and cast them using your Sorcerer slots should your Healing Light pool go dry. Radiant damage spells can also come in handy, however not as hard-hitting after getting Elemental Adept: Fire. Celestial Warlock is more of a secondary healer taking, well, how restricted Pact Magic is into consideration, after all.

        Oh, and you can also grab Aspect of the Moon invocation if you’re tempted by coffeelock shenanigans. However, have in mind that’s on you if your DM looks down on you for that.

  2. Friendly edit suggestion: Destructive Wrath is the damage maximizing channel divinity feature from the tempest sub class, not Destructive Wave.

  3. I’ve been trying to make a character that attacks by using their mind to levitate swords or spears and stab their foes, I have Aberrant Mind down but I was going to mix it with a fighter subclass, but I’m not quite sure which to do, high elf is the race BTW

    1. It might depend on how open you are to re-flavoring. You could flavor any attack as being a telekinetic attack. The Psi Warrior seems like a natural fit.

    1. It will ultimately depend on what you want to accomplish. I assume you’d want to be a blaster with this combination. The Tempest Cleric can use heavy armor, so the Draconic Bloodline’s AC boost is redundant. I’d probably go with Storm Sorcery if I were to make this type of blaster. You can cast Hold Person to paralyze an enemy, then cast Chromatic Orb at point-black melee range for an auto-crit paired with Channel Divinity: Destructive Wrath to max all the crit dice. Pretty cool!

  4. Would gold draconic bloodline/rune knight be a good combination, I think 12 in Sorcerer and 8 in fighter, but what do you think?

      1. I want to create a dragon knight without having to use a dragonborn or a paladin, but with draconic related abilities and a close combat topped with able to use magic

              1. So basically a character who has dragon blood but isn’t a dragonborn, has abilities and magic because of said dragon blood and they also sometimes like to be in their enemy’s face, But also leaning twords druidic abilities but not a duid

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